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GOLD HAT
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A setting of the epigraph from the opening of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel ‘The Great Gatsby’. The words are attributed to Thomas Parke D’Invilliers, a pen-name of Fitzgerald’s.

“Then wear the gold hat, if that will move her;
If you can bounce high, bounce for her too,
Till she cry “Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
I must have you!”

Released 01 May 2013
Bandcamp >>

FOLLY
CD, 2011
£9 via Paypal, inc. P&P.

  1. The Man Behind The Rhododendron
  2. Benjamin Bowmaneer
  3. Forget-me-not
  4. Kiss V
  5. Hoax And Benison
  6. Honey In The Rock
  7. No 32
  8. Lullaby For The Beleaguered

“Folly is very English, very unusual and proof that if you want to make art, you just have to ignore debilitating forces and get on with it.”
**** The Times






HONEY IN THE ROCK
7″ Vinyl, 2011
£4.50 via Paypal, inc. P&P.

  1. A side: Honey in the Rock
  2. B side: Hoax and Benison






MY MOTHER’S CHILDREN
CD, 2008
£9 via Paypal, inc. P&P.

  1. Because You’re Young
  2. Free Grace
  3. Honey
  4. Concerning A Frozen Sparrow
  5. Ballad Of The Talking Dog
  6. Pygmalion
  7. Meanwhile…
  8. The Bell They Gave You
  9. Island
  10. Exeunt

“Terrifying and gorgeous….unusual and strong…..epic and tiny… ‘My Mother’s Children’ is an album I know I am going to love for life.”
Eliza Carthy, fRoots April 08







BOOK TWO
CD-r, 2007
£7 via Paypal, inc. P&P.

  1. Silver Pebble
  2. Sweet Dreams of Nancy
  3. Pretty Polly
  4. Bonny Boy
  5. Hares in the Old Plantation
  6. The Song of Wandering Aengus






BOOK ONE
CDr, 2005
£7 via Paypal, inc. P&P.

  1. Silver Dagger
  2. Love Me Little
  3. The Gardener
  4. Let No Man Steal Your Thyme
  5. Eros
  6. Fare Thee Well

“At a time when it sometimes seems that one cannot move for new folk, free folk, freak folk, weird folk, outsider folk and goodness knows what else, it’s an unqualified joy to discover a collection of songs that sit proudly and uncomplicatedly within the folk tradition. And yet, while Mary Hampton’s debut CD … certainly derives much of its appeal from its appropriation of centuries-old folk idioms, it is certainly no museum piece. Its unearthly radiance and undercurrents of desolate modernity transform it into a vital and contemporary living document.”
Sound Projector, issue 15, 2007